DR. KEFAH HUSNI AL DEBEK WAS “PROUD TO GIVE BACK DURING THE PANDEMIC”

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Working for Latifah Hospital, Dubai Health Authority (DHA) during the pandemic, Syrian charge nurse Dr. Kefah Husni Al Debek was grateful for the opportunity to give back to her adopted country, the UAE.

Abu Dhabi:  When the COVID-19 pandemic started to arrive in the UAE, Syrian charge nurse Kefah Husni Al Debek admitted that she was scared, but that she put those concerns to one side to serve humanity and give back to the people of the UAE.

“Of course, when the precautionary measures started being implemented in the UAE, I was certainly scared just like everyone else. At the end of the day, we are human, regardless of the roles we play.”

“But I thought fear wasn’t enough; we had to take action,” she says, remembering her initial fears in 2020.

At that point, she reveals, her mindset changed: “We can’t have soldiers be afraid on the battlefield, and for us, this is our battlefield; Victory is the only solution we have.”

Working on the frontlines at Dubai Health Authority made her feel proud, and she says she was in touch with her ability to give back to this to this beautiful country.

Having moved from Algeria to the UAE in 1997, Dr. Kefah was ready to make the ultimate sacrifice for her adopted home, and, said that working on the frontlines at Dubai Health Authority made her feel proud, and in touch with her ability to give back to this to this beautiful country.

“Frankly, the United Arab Emirates is a symbol of love and deserves that we offer it everything that’s precious. Honestly, the thing that kept me going and encouraged me to make a difference was the people. Whether they were patients or not. Feeling that they needed us gave me the motivation to do my best, even on the days that I felt tired and exhausted,” she adds.

Even when she felt like giving up , it was the people’s need for her that pushed her to continue, as well the support her and her fellow medical professionals received from everyone.

One of her most treasured memories, and something she was very proud of while taking care of her patients, is that she and her team were able to be the link between patients and their family

“We were always facilitators. We would communicate via video or Skype with the patient’s family – let them see and talk to each other. These were moments that made me feel the meaning of humanity. It made me understand how important it is for humans to be there for one another.”

While it was a period of mixed emotions, including fear and anxiety as she tirelessly worked around the clock to help others in need, she is also grateful for the opportunity to serve.