VIGILANT GLUCOSE-MONITORING IS KEY TO FASTING SAFELY FOR PEOPLE WITH DIABETES DURING RAMADAN

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Patients should consult a doctor in advance, and be alert to blood sugar fluctuations, dehydration and other red flags, says an expert from Mubadala Health’s Imperial College London Diabetes Centre

Dr Farhana Bin Lootah, an internal medical consultant at ICLDC


Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates: To ensure people with diabetes are fasting safely, they should seek the advice of a doctor ahead of Ramadan, and throughout the fasting period they will need to be vigilant in checking their blood sugar levels, and will need to know the health risks and warning signs to watch for, advises an expert from Imperial College London Diabetes Centre (ICLDC), a Mubadala Health partner.

Dr Farhana Bin Lootah, an internal medical consultant at ICLDC, explains that the four main risks of fasting for a person with diabetes are hypoglycaemia (low blood sugar), hyperglycaemia (high blood sugar), dehydration, and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), which is a serious complication of diabetes involving very high sugar levels together with formation of excess acids in the blood.

In general, people with type 1 diabetes are exempt from fasting, although it is possible for this category to fast healthily in certain cases, while some people with type 2 diabetes will also be advised not to fast. Dr Farhana explains that when patients seek advice, their doctor will consider their type of diabetes (type 1, type 2 or gestational diabetes), their medical history including kidney health, and whether their blood sugar has been well-controlled for a significant period, among other factors.

Once cleared for fasting, patients will need to check their blood sugar several times a day, Dr Farhana says, as the levels can fluctuate significantly when the body enters into a fasting state and after breaking the fast, particularly if the iftar meal is a large one.

“Your body enters into a fasting state around eight hours after your last meal, and it will initially use stored sources of glucose, which can increase the risk of low blood sugar on some medications and/or insulin,” she explains.

Self-monitoring of glucose levels is essential and approved both in religious and medical contexts. “Religious scholars agree that taking blood samples either by finger-pricking or by a needle from arm veins to check blood-sugar levels does not invalidate the fast, and doctors agree it is important to perform the tests as they help patients fast safely,” says Dr Farhana.

Suggested timings for blood-glucose monitoring

Dr Farhana says that the recommended frequency of blood tests depends on the level of diabetes control and which form of diabetes is present. In general terms, though, a minimum of one to two tests per day is recommended for people with type 2 diabetes, and a minimum of two to three tests for type 1.

ICLDC suggests the following potential timetable and targets:

  • Before suhoor: blood glucose targets should be 120-140mg/dl
  • Mid-morning: blood glucose targets should be 140-180mg/dl
  • Midday: blood glucose targets should be 120-180mg/dl
  • Before iftar: blood glucose targets should not be below 70mg/dl
  • 2 hours after iftar: blood glucose targets should not be above 180mg/dl
  • At any time when there are symptoms suggestive of low blood sugar or high blood sugar or when feeling unwell

Dr Farhana adds that patients should be prepared to immediately break their fast if they have any of the following signs:

  • Blood sugar level of less than 70 mg/dl
  • Blood sugar level of more than 300 mg/dl
  • Symptoms of low blood sugar (for example, feeling dizzy, sweaty or shaky, blurred vision, confusion or inability to think clearly, loss of consciousness)
  • Symptoms of acute illness (for example, vomiting or diarrhoea)

In addition to checking blood sugar levels, people with diabetes will need to drink plenty of water during non-fasting hours to avoid the increased risk of dehydration, Dr Farhana advises.

“In short, with appropriate planning and monitoring, and by enlisting the help of a medical expert, a person with diabetes will be far better equipped to handle the unique set of challenges he or she faces during Ramadan,” Dr Farhana says.

Mubadala Health facilities offer telehealth services across many specialties for the convenience and safety of elderly patients and those with chronic conditions.

About Mubadala Health:

Mubadala Health is the integrated healthcare network of Mubadala Investment Company. Established 2021, Mubadala Health operates, manages, and develops a portfolio of healthcare assets including: Abu Dhabi Telemedicine Centre (ADTC), Amana Healthcare, Capital Health Screening Centre (CHSC), Healthpoint, Imperial College London Diabetes Centre (ICLDC), and National Reference Laboratory (NRL). In addition, Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi is an integral part of Mubadala Health. With a vision to transform the regional healthcare landscape, Mubadala Health sets a new benchmark for the UAE and regional healthcare industry through its state-of-the-art facilities and world-class caregivers who strive to put patients first across its continuum of care. Innovation, research, and education are the foundational pillars of Mubadala Health, supporting the further development of a sustainable healthcare sector in line with the vision of Abu Dhabi and the region.

About Imperial College London Diabetes Centre:

Imperial College London Diabetes Centre (ICLDC), a Mubadala Health partner, is a state-of-the-art outpatient facility that specialises in diabetes treatment, research, training and public health awareness. In just over a decade, the Centre has gained international renown for its holistic approach to the treatment of diabetes and related complications that enables patients to receive the full spectrum of care they need in one place.

With more than 80 diabetes professionals and endocrinologists under one roof, ICLDC offers best-in-class medical attention from first diagnosis to disease management across 11 specialist practice areas including adult and paediatric endocrinology, treatment of metabolic and electrolyte disorders, pre- and post-bariatric surgery care, heart disease prevention, nutritional advice, diabetes education services, ophthalmology, nephrology and podiatry.

ICLDC was established in 2006 in Abu Dhabi by Mubadala in partnership with the UK’s Imperial College London to address the growing demand for diabetes care in the UAE. The centre now operates three branches across Abu Dhabi and Al Ain, touching the lives of more than one million people through patient-centric programmes and public health initiatives. In 2007, ICLDC launched Diabetes. Knowledge. Action, now the longest running public health awareness campaign in the country. The initiative promotes an active lifestyle through an ongoing calendar of events for the whole community – Major activations include an annual walkathon that coincides with the World Diabetes Day in November.

ICLDC holds the Joint Commission International (JCI) Clinical Care Program Certification in Outpatient Diabetes Management and JCI Accreditation for Ambulatory Care.